Last edited by Vudoll
Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

7 edition of David Ruggles found in the catalog.

David Ruggles

Graham Russell Hodges

David Ruggles

a radical black abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City

by Graham Russell Hodges

  • 400 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ruggles, David, -- 1810-1849,
  • Abolitionists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Biography,
  • Abolitionists -- Massachusetts -- Biography,
  • African American abolitionists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Biography,
  • African American abolitionists -- Massachusetts -- Biography,
  • Underground Railroad -- New York (State) -- New York,
  • Underground Railroad -- Massachusetts,
  • Antislavery movements -- New York (State) -- New York -- History,
  • Antislavery movements -- Massachusetts -- History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementGraham Russell Gao Hodges.
    GenreBiography
    SeriesThe John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE449.R94 H63 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23655143M
    ISBN 109780807833261
    LC Control Number2009031106
    OCLC/WorldCa428926481

    Ruggles’s work in the Dixon and Darg cases pushed Seward into these ac-tions. His associations made Ruggles a minor part of the national election later that year when a Democrat tried to tarnish the Whig candidate, con-tending that William Henry Harrison sought “the support of the Arthur Tap-pans and David Ruggles of the North.”¹Cited by: The David Ruggles Center for History and Education added 4 new photos to the album: Henry Anthony, early African American settler of Florence. February 2, Henry Anthony, formery enslaved in Maryland is one of the earliest known African American residents of Florence.5/5(5).

      The result is this fine book One wonders why it has taken so long for historians to give Ruggles his due. Thankfully Hodges has done so This is a benchmark biography.—Left History William Lloyd Garrison lauded [David Ruggles's] contributions to the abolitionist : Graham Russell Gao Hodges. David Marshall Ruggles, of Elmore City, passed away March 8, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma at the age of 52 years. David was born in Winnsboro, Texas to Dale Marshall and Berna Dean Born:

    David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of the most often overlooked--figures of the early abolitionist movement in America. Graham Russell Gao Hodges provides the first biography of this African American activist, writer, publisher, and hydrotherapist who secured liberty for more than six hundred former bond Brand: The University of North Carolina Press. Graham Hodges talked about his book David Ruggles: A Radical Black Aboliitonist and the Underground Railroad in New York City (University of North Carolina Press, ). David Ruggles was .


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David Ruggles by Graham Russell Hodges Download PDF EPUB FB2

David Ruggles book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of th 4/5(1). David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of the most often overlooked--figures of the early abolitionist movement in America.

Graham Russell Gao Hodges provides the first biography of this African American activist, writer, publisher, and hydrotherapist who secured liberty for more than six hundred former bond. David Ruggles: A Radical Black Abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City (John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture (Paperback)) by David Ruggles book | Aug 1, out of 5 stars 4.

The Author of this book does a nice job telling the story of a great but largely forgotten could not have been an easy book to Ruggles was a very brave man whose story needed to be told and it is an interesting book Russell Hodges does a clever job writng this tale,pieced together from many different sources Cited by: David Ruggles was born in Norwich, Connecticut inthe eldest of seven children, to free black parents.

His father, David Sr., was a blacksmith. His mother, Nancy, was a noted caterer and a founding member of the local Methodist church. Ruggles was educated at religious charity schools in Norwich.

Ruggles was born in in Connecticut. His father, David Sr. was a blacksmith and woodcutter while his mother, Nancy, was a caterer. The Ruggles family included eight children. As African-Americans who had acquired wealth, the family lived in the affluent Bean Hill area and were devout Methodists.

Ruggles attended Sabbath : Femi Lewis. Born on Main Lyme, a small fishing village near Norwich, Connecticut, Ruggles was the first of eight children of free blacks David and Nancy Ruggles. David David Ruggles book. was born in. The book was adapted into a television film of the same title which first aired April 7,on received a Nielsen rating of and was viewed in million households.

The film starred Scott Bairstow as Mark Kinney, Amy Jo Johnson as Susan McConnell, Mario Lopez as David Ruggles, and Jay Thomas as Mr. Griffin, and was directed by Jack : Lois Duncan. David Ruggles passed away on January 7, in Harwich, : David Ruggles was arguably the first full-time black activist in the United States.

He operated New York’s first library and bookstore for black people, edited and sold newspapers and magazines, and founded a black high school and a literary society. David Ruggles was born free in Connecticut, a state with a rich revolutionary heritage. Those facts affected his later life immensely.

Born on Main Lyme, a small fishing village near Norwich, Connecticut, Ruggles was the first of eight children of. David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of the most often overlooked--figures of the early abolitionist movement in America.

Graham Russell Gao Hodges provides the first biography of this African American activist, writer, publisher, and hydrotherapist who secured liberty for more than six hundred former bond Cited by:   Dr. Hodges, whose book, “David Ruggles: A Radical Black Abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City” (University of North Carolina Press), will reach stores March 1, attempts to reestablish Ruggles as a major figure in the American antislavery movement, while drawing focus to New York as an important locale for abolitionist.

for Book Longevity of the Council on Library Resources. The University of North Carolina Press has been a member of the Green Press Initiative since Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hodges, Graham Russell, – David Ruggles: a radical black abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City /.

David Ruggles helped enslaved people to freedom during the s despite attempts to kill him, kidnap him and burn down his business. A free black man born in Connecticut, he ultimately paid for his courage.

He suffered ill-health, calumny and a shortened life. David Ruggles wrote fiery articles on the evils of slavery, antagonizing [ ]. David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of the most often overlooked--figures of the early abolitionist movement in America.

Graham Russell Gao Hodges provides the first biography of this African American activist, writer, publisher, and hydrotherapist who secured liberty for more than six hundred former bond people, the most Author: Graham Russell Gao Hodges. The David Ruggles Center for History and Education - Nonotuck St, Florence, Massachusetts - Rated 5 based on 5 Reviews "This is such an 5/5(5).

David Ruggles Home David Ruggles might have been the most hated activist of his day. One slave catcher screamed that he would give "a thousand dollars if I had Ruggles in my hands as he is the leader." And Ruggles was just that—a leader against slavery.

He came to New York around from Connecticut, where he was born free. David Ruggles () was one of the most heroic--and has been one of the most often overlooked--figures of the early abolitionist movement in America. Graham Russell Gao Hodges provides the first biography of this African American activist, writer, publisher, and hydrotherapist who secured liberty for more than six hundred former bond people, the most.

The courageous man was David Ruggles, a major figure in the American antislavery movement and the nation’s first black journalist and printer.

Ruggles was born in Connecticut in to free black parents. He arrived in NYC in (the year New York abolished slavery), 17 years old, brash, educated, and seemingly fearless.

David Ruggles Scholarship With the goal of actively working to achieve a more diverse and inclusive community of booksellers and librarians, thanks to the generosity of Lisa Unger Baskin, CABS Minnesota is pleased invite applicants for a scholarship for $2, to cover the cost of tuition, room and board ($1,) with the additional $David Ruggles was born Lyme, Connecticut to David and Nancy Ruggles in His parents were both free blacks.

The family moved to Norwich, where his father was a blacksmith and woodcutter and his mother a caterer. They were devout Methodists.

David .The Book has its flaws but in general terms, its worth the time, energy and money. —-Book Series In Order» Authors» Katie Ruggle. BOOK OF THE MONTH: I’m a big fan of David Baldacci, and I absolutely love his Amos Decker: Memory Man series. We recently conducted a poll among visitors and the Memory Man series was voted the 8th most.